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Brewins Youth Hockey COVID-19 Protocol 

The following are typical scenarios associated with how Brewins Youth Hockey players (parents and/or guardians of players) and coaches should approach participation in Brewins events for those experiencing symptoms, exposure, and potential exposure to COVID-19. Symptoms include: fever, chills, shortness of breath, and/or cough. 

 

1. Players or coaches experiencing cold/flu-like symptoms or symptoms consistent with COVID-19:

Individuals should stay at home and away from the team and/or arena until symptoms no longer persist. Individuals may return once ALL symptoms are no longer present. You must be fever free for at least three days. Parents and/or guardians should not seek or rely on the coaches advice for this. Rather, keep your player(s) home if they are feeling sick or have symptoms.

 

2. Players or coaches have tested positive for COVID-19:

If a player or coach has tested positive for COVID-19, you must cease participation in all Brewins events and the individual or the player’s parents and/or guardian(s) must contact a Brewins Youth Hockey Health and Safety Committee representative immediately. The Brewins will contact the local Board of Health (“BOH”) and the appropriate arena(s) and will follow the instructions from the BOH to determine if any other players or teams will be required to quarantine. Players and coaches may return no sooner than 14 days following a positive test, and after a test indicating negative results. Players and coaches should not return if symptoms persist.

 

3. Players or coaches have been in “close contact” with individual(s) who have tested positive for COVID-19:

If players and/or coaches have been in “close contact with individual(s) who have tested positive for COVID-19, you must cease participation in all Brewins events and it is encouraged that those within close contact get tested. Upon knowledge of potential exposure, individual(s) or parents and/or guardians must contact a Brewins Youth Hockey Health and Safety Committee representative immediately. If a player or coach has been exposed and attended a Brewins event, the Brewins will contact the local BOH and will follow the instructions from the BOH to determine if the players or coaches, or any other players or teams will be required to quarantine. If quarantine is determined to be required, players and coaches may return after 14 days from contact with a person who has tested positive, provided they are not showing any symptoms or by producing a negative test result, or at least 10 days, provided all of the following are satisfied:

  • players/coaches have not had, and do not have, any symptoms;
  • players/coaches are tested on day 8 of your quarantine period or later using a molecular diagnostic test (e.g., polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) to detect the presence of the virus;
  • players/coaches receive a negative test result; and
  • players are monitored and coaches monitor themselves for symptoms for the full 14 days. If players/coaches develop symptoms you should contact your health care provider and be re-tested.

 4. Players or coaches have been in close contact with individual(s) who have tested negative for COVID-19:

Players and coaches may resume activities provided they have no symptoms.

 

Please note that the preceding are some possible scenarios/examples. If you have questions related to these protocols, please contact a Brewins Youth Hockey Health & Safety representative. The local Board of Health along with the Brewins Youth Hockey Health & Safety Committee will be responsible for clearing individuals prior to resuming participation in Brewins events.


 

Close Contact: (As defined by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention) Someone who was within 6 feet of an infected person for a cumulative total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period* starting from 2 days before illness onset (or, for asymptomatic patients, 2 days prior to test specimen collection) until the time the patient is isolated.

* Individual exposures added together over a 24-hour period (e.g., three 5-minute exposures for a total of 15 minutes). Data are limited, making it difficult to precisely define “close contact;” however, 15 cumulative minutes of exposure at a distance of 6 feet or less can be used as an operational definition for contact investigation. Factors to consider when defining close contact include proximity (closer distance likely increases exposure risk), the duration of exposure (longer exposure time likely increases exposure risk), whether the infected individual has symptoms (the period around onset of symptoms is associated with the highest levels of viral shedding), if the infected person was likely to generate respiratory aerosols (e.g., was coughing, singing, shouting), and other environmental factors (crowding, adequacy of ventilation, whether exposure was indoors or outdoors). Because the general public has not received training on proper selection and use of respiratory PPE, such as an N95, the determination of close contact should generally be made irrespective of whether the contact was wearing respiratory PPE.  At this time, differential determination of close contact for those using fabric face coverings is not recommended.